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Local News Archives for 2013-04


OSU-Cascades Will Offer New Degree


Oregon State University- Cascades Campus will offer its 17th undergraduate degree in the fall and it's one that is gaining a lot of interest.

 

OSU-Cascades spokesperson Christine Coffin says the Computer Science Degree will have a option for web and mobile web software development.

 

They worked with about 19 high tech companies - like Facebook and Advanced Energy to create the criteria for the degree. 

 

"We have heard from industry that there is a lot of need. So we hope the interest and the need will create a popular program. But we anticipate a lot of interest in it."

 

Coffin says they are also working with the Multiple Engineering Cooperative Program - a group of more than 100 companies in Oregon and Washington to enable computer science students to access some 6-month paid internships.

Pilot Butte Student Wins Art Award


A Pilot Butte Middle School art student recently learned her landscape  titled "Violet Mountains" has won a National American Vision Gold Medal in the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards competition.

 

Eighth grader Olivia Springer is one of about 2000 Middle and High School students in the nation who were chosen for the prestigious award, out of over 100,000 entries.

 

Art teacher Pat Roberts says the normally very shy Springer stepped forward when the opportunity was presented to her.

 

"When I opened up the opportunity to the students, I said find your best pieces let's enter 'em, lets enter something in scholastic. And she stepped up and said 'I want to enter scholastic this year, and I want to enter this piece.' It won a gold key locally; and then it went on for national judging and it won a national medal.  So we're heading to Carnegie Hall."

 

Roberts says they are holding fundraisers to send Olivia and her father to the awards ceremony in June.

Driver Card Bill Passes Oregon House


Central Oregon lawmakers voted against a bill that allows illegal immigrants to get a "driver's card" in Oregon. - but it  easily passed in the house on Tuesday.

 

Wednesday The governor will sign Senate Bill 833 into law during a special May Day celebration.

 

Before Tuesday’s House vote State Representative Mike McLane of Powell Butte urged a "no" vote.

 

“I don’t know about you colleagues but in my district the DMV is not the most popular agency in the state- quite a few complaints actually come to me about the DMV. I’m alittle unsettled giving such enormous discretion for implementation for such an important bill to the DMV.”

 

Those in favor of the bill say it will make the roads safer for everyone because more people will get car insurance and take the necessary driving tests.  

 

They also say that similar laws have been successful in other states.

Bend PD Community Liaison Officer Retiring


After twelve years on the job, he'll be retiring on May 15th.

 

Esselstyn has been instrumental in developing Bend PD's volunteer program and has lent his time and expertise to endless community events.

 

After his retirement, he is planning on volunteering at the police department to ensure a smooth transition for his successor.

Jefferson County Investigators Still Searching for a Motive in Deadly Shooting Over the Weekend


19 year old Devon Moschetti was killed.

 

The suspect is 24 year old Montana Marlatt.  He is the older brother of one of the other men hunting.


Jefferson County Sheriff Jim Adkins says the homicide is hard on the whole community.

 

"I actually know both families, both the suspect and the victim.  They're both in shock.  The victim's family is in greivance mode and angry about what happened.  They don't understand it either."

 

Marlatt is in custody, but is not talking.

 

A celebration of Devon Moschetti's life is planned for this Friday at 2 P.M. at Sahalee Park in Madras.

 

 

Mosiac Medical in Prineville To Go Smoke-Free and Others Will Follow


It is located in the Crook County Health Department building.  Starting this Wednesday (May 1st) Mosiac Medial in Prineville will implement a smoke and tobacco free policy.

 

Elaine Knobbs with Mosiac says it just made sense.

 

"We just know that tobacco use is the number one cause of preventable death.  There are over 64 deaths a year in Crook County attributable to smoking and tobacco use.  And as a care provider it is our obligation to have a smoke and tobacco free environment or patients, employees and visitors."

 

Knobbs say Mosaic Medical plans to go smoke-free in its other facilities in Bend, Redmond and Madras in the next year.

Bend City Councilor Mark Capell Not Surprised Central Oregon Landwatch Still Opposes Water Plan


They filed a lawsuit last year that stopped the project and that's when the city came up with a new plan that took less water out of Tumalo Creek.

 

Bend City Councilor Mark Capell is not surprised Central Oregon Landwatch doesn't like this plan any better.

 

"We need to give the citizens of Bend a safe, reliable supply of drinking water.  Where Landwatch just concerns itself with the river and stopping growth.  The City Council approach is much more balanced.  We'll consider how do we do growth intelligently, protect the river and supply water."

 

Capell expects Central Oregon Landwatch to file another lawsuit in federal court this summer objecting to the proejct.

 

But he's confident the Forest Service's assessment of the project's minimal environmental impact, will help them win in court.

 

The city hopes to start construction on the pipeline this September.

Local High School Rank High in Testing


After students took the "A-P" - or advanced placement tests - local high schools ranked in the top 10-percent in the state according to a recent U-S News and World Report ranking.

 

Oregon has about 278 high schools and Summit is ranked 12th - Bend High is16th and Mountain View is 30th.

 

Bend La Pine School District spokesperson Vicki van Buren says they are a leader in the state in many things.

 

"Our three high schools do perform very well in comparison to other high schools across the state and we're very proud of that. i think its because of the work we do and the quality teaching that we're able to provide our students."

 

Van Buren says the ranking is especially significant because they are compared to some schools that pay their students to take the optional "A-P" test, and district students choose to take it on their own.

 

She adds that this information will be added to the district and high school profile- that is sent to colleges with student transcripts.

Bend Looking to Pretty Up Third Street


The City of Bend is looking to revive the Third Street improvement project that was put on the back burner on 2007, thanks to the economy.

 

Nick Arniss, City Transportation Manager says they are looking forward to actually beginning the project up again.

 

"We’re excited about it, because we want to see in the short term some things we can do immediately to improve safety and improve sidewalks and curb ramps and to be looking in the long term to some really major ideas. We’ll be doing some short term things also; good of the order of trying to improve things that are out there right now."

 

Arniss says they are considering possibly narrowing the street between Revere and Franklin and making it more pedestrian and bike friendly, but they are open to lots of ideas.

 

The state has given the city about $115,000 to hire a consultant and get the project off the ground.

 

Oh How We Love Dogs in Bend


Bend has been named on several lists for being very pet friendly; in fact some tourists come to Bend because they can bring their dog and play in out great outdoors.

 

There’s an old saying that you're not really a “Bendite” unless you have a dog, and stats seem to bear that out.

 

Lynne Ouchida with the Humane Society of Central Oregon says almost 50% of households have at least one dog and Bend has the highest rate of pet adoption in the nation, as well as pet return to owner rates. Why?  We love out pets.

 

"Central Oregon seems to attract active, retired people who value the outdoor recreation and lifestyle that Central Oregon has to offer. And that is a huge benefit to animals. People are getting out year-round. Think of the valley. You only have a few months a year to get out and enjoy walking with our dog and enjoying all the open space and dog parks. Central Oregon has lots of months throughout the year to enjoy."

 

Ouchida always recommends you spay or neuter your animal and make sure they have proper I.D.. for a happy lifetime with your furry friend.

Shot Fired in Prineville Dispute


A Prineville homeowner decided to settle something on his own by allegedly shooting at a vehicle he believed was trespassing on his property.

 

Apparently Corina Wright, 38, had driven Jinsetta Haynes, 38,- both from Prineville, to the property of Rease Endicott, 70.

 

There was a dispute between Endicott and Wright and Endicott went into his house, got a rifle and shot at the ground in front of the women's car.

 

The women fled to another location, reporting the incident to the Crook County Sheriff who investigated and  took Endicott into custody, charging him with reckless endangerment and menacing with a firearm. 

 

He has posted bail and awaiting a court date.

Manhunt Near Madras Ends in Shooting


A three-hour manhunt ended with an Oregon State Police trooper shooting and wounding a burglary suspect northeast of Madras.

 

Around 2:15 Friday afternoon, Jefferson County Sheriff's Deputies responded to the report of a burglary and trespass at a home off Fern Lane, about 10 miles northeast of Madras.

 

Several police agencies; a tracking dog a search plane were deployed to search for an unidentified suspect - the man had fled in an SUV. They eventually found the abandoned car in a remote wooded area.

 

OSP Lt. Gregg Hastings says the long pursuit ended just after 5 p.m. when an officer reportedly shot him.

 

He was taken to St. Charles - Bend by air ambulance and is being treated for his wound.

 

The Oregon State Police will release more details on this incident at a later time.

Intimate Personal Violence Incidents Growing


Domestic violence or “Intimate Personal Violence” (IPV) in Central Oregon is a growing problem, and some victims may not even know they are victims.

 

Laurie Hubbard, a public health nurse with Deschutes County says once they see a person they suspect is being abused, just asking some well chosen questions can reveal their situation.

 

"We might ask; does someone shame or humiliate you? Do you feel safe and healthy in your relationship? Does anyone threaten you or hurt you or threaten to hurt you? Does anyone control or restrict your whereabouts, your money, your friendships, your cellphone use? Some of these questions lead to the answers that might direct us to give people information about services."

 

Hubbard says one in four women and one in seven men are victims of IPV.

 

She says the non-profit "Saving Grace" is the primary place victims are referred to for a safe haven and information on violence prevention.

 

And she adds that if you know of someone who may be in a violent or controlling situation - being an open line of communication and support for them if your best action.

La Pine High Cheer Coach Arrested on Sex Abuse Charges


It was about a week ago that 30 year old La Pine resident and former high school cheer coach Nicole Mickelson was arrested on various sex abuse and alcohol charges.

 

The Deschutes County Sheriff was tipped in March to the rumors that Mickelson was allegedly involved with a 17 year old boy inappropriately.

 

The investigation led to charges being filed against her last week.

 

An unidentified student at La Pine High spoke with our news partner - News Channel 21 about Mickelson.

 

"She was nice. She definitely got along with everybody; kind of had that high school mentality, so she kind of fit in, and I never expected that."

 

School District officials say Mickelson resigned from her position before the investigation was completed.

 

She currently is out on bail and will be in court on May 2nd.

The City of Bend Will Continue Its Search for a Permanent Fire Chief


Two weeks ago, the city conducted interviews for the finalists, but wasn't able to find a satisfactory candidate.

 

Rob Duvalle is the director of the city's human resources.

 

"We had an extensive process.  We had a variety of partners, the fire district and fire association.  And we set high stnadards for what we're looking for through that process.  We had two candidates which we proceeded to the next stage where we did further interviews looking at the candidate's needs and the city's needs and unfortunately we were not able to secure a successful outcome for the city."

 

Former Bend Fire Chief Larry Langstone has agreed to serve as the city's interim Fire Chief until a permament replacement is found.

 

He will take over next Monday.

Deschutes County Commissioners O.K. Jail Bonds for Expansion


Full faith and credit bonds will pay for the projet.  That means the county wil  borrow the money with the understanding they will generate enough revenue to cover payments.

 

County Commissioner Tammy Baney says this will help us deal with the jail overcrowding for the foreseeable future.

 

"This is as trim as you can get.  This is a Hyundai.  It's sufficient.  It might not be the smoothest ride, but it's conservative and I appreciate that.  And in today's eocnomic climate, there's a tendency to push the envelope.  I'm glad this is conservative and we can do this without raising taxes and that is huge."

 

The expansion will add 144 beds to the existing jail in north Bend.

 

The work is scheduled to start this spring and finish by June 2014.

Central Oregon Landwatch Still Critical of Bend's New Water Plan


The group filed a federal lawsuit against the Forest Service claiming they did not adequately look at the project's impact on fish and wetlands.

 

A judge issued an injunction to stop the project and the city and Forest Service decided to come up with a new plan.

 

Paul Dewey, the Director of Central Oregon Landwatch says the new plan doesn't differ much from the past one.

 

"Yeah, it really has the same problems as the last one.  We don't really see a basis on which the court would issue any other decision that would it did the last time."

 

A judge stopped the project last fall and the city decided rather than waiting until the judge ruled on the lawsuit -- they would submit another plan for the water project.

 

The Forest Service has found in its new analysis the environmental impact would be minimal.

 

 

 

"

Prineville Man Tied up at home during Robbery


the Crook County Sheriff's office says a Prineville man who suffered injuries to his hands from being tied up tightly for five hours is home from the local hospital.  Undersheriff John Gautney says this is a serious case for Prineville and other areas.  He also says it's not a Home Invasion because the suspect and alleged victim knew each other.  Here is the Sheriff's Department's full news release from 3:00am Thursday:

 

***********************************************************************

 

On April 24th, 2013 at about 9:40pm Oregon State Trooper Josh Nagle conducted a traffic stop on HWY 126 E near the intersection of HWY 97 in Redmond. Trooper Nagle stopped a 2008 Jeep Wrangler for driving without headlights and made contact with the driver, Skyler Suchodolski age 20 of Prineville. After the Trooper made contact with the driver he became suspicious of the driver and the contents in the vehicle. Trooper Nagle questioned Suchodolski about the ownership of the vehicle and he told the Trooper he borrowed the car from the owner.

The white 2008 Jeep Wrangler is registered to Leo Novak, age 73 of Prineville. Trooper Nagle observed an empty pistol holster in the vehicle and further questioned Suchodolski about weapons in the car. Trooper Nagle then observed a pistol under the front seat and placed Suchodolski in handcuffs. Trooper Nagle then contacted Crook County dispatch and asked that they send an officer to do a welfare check at Novak's home. Police found him tied to a kitchen chair.

Novak told Officers that he had been bound by Suchodolski nearly five hours earlier after the two of them had sat and visited. 

Suchodolski was transported back to the Crook County Jail where he was charged with 1st degree Robbery, 1st degree Kidnapping, 1st degree Burglary, 4 counts of 1st degree Theft, Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle, Coercion, Assault II and menacing. Bail is $215,000 dollars.

Dr. Cook, who was the attending E.R. Dr. at Pioneer Memorial Hospital at the time Novak arrived stated that had Novak not been discovered by the responding officers his hands would most likely have to be amputated if left with the ligatures on much longer.

Distracted Drivers Surveyed in Bend


Bend Police and volunteers are hiding at some busy intersections to see how many people are texting or talking on hand-held phones while driving.

 

 Bend officer Leo Lotito says distracted driving continues to be a big problem - and in that category- illegal cell phone use makes up a big portion of distracted driving. 

 

"Between 12 and 20 percent still on the roads- cell phone use or texting among drivers-  we actually put a volunteer out there- sometimes its a traffic officer - we are out of sight keeping track of how many people are using their cells phones-...doing a survey at the time."

 

He says 12 to 20 percent is probably a low figure.  April is "Distracted Driving Awareness Month."

Bomb Scare at Madras Store


Some scary moments for the customers at the Erickson’s Sentry Market in Madras Wednesday night.

 

Around 7:15 p.m. Store Manager Josh Bibler received a call from an anonymous man.

 

"Somebody called on the phone and said they put a bomb in the store and it was going to blow up. I called the cops and evacuated everybody out of the store and let the cops search the store."

 

Bibler says people understood and immediately left the store and police quickly searched the store, did not find anything and within the hour, everyone returned to the store.

 

He says he did not recognize the man's voice, and didn't know why the store was chosen as a target; but police advised him to take note of the phone number if another call comes in.

City Manager Candidate Interviewed Thursday


Redmond residents had the chance to meet the three finalists for the Redmond City Manager position  Wednesday.

 

Mayor George  Endicott says the three finalists: current City Councilor Camden King; Keith Witcosky from Portland and Ashton Harrison from Colorado,all bring different strengths to the table.  

 

"They’re actually different. One is a city councilor now, has his own private company. The second one is Ashton - the guy from Colorado, who is a county administrator and was a city administrator before that. And then Keith - is the head of Economic Development for Portland and he's been in that job for a dozen years."

 

Endicott says Thursday the three will interview with three different committees; and he's hoping for a decision sooner than later.

Central Oregon Business Expo Has a Lot to Offer


The 15th Annual Central Oregon Business Expo is at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds Thursday from 1p.m. until 5 p.m.

 

Karen Sande with the Redmond Chamber of Commerce says the event kicks off with a luncheon at noon.  This year's keynote speaker is Becky Johnson, the Vice President of Oregon State University - Cascades Campus.

 

"What she's going to talk about is what the university is going to give back to Central Oregon; how it's going to help the local businesses and help the consumers in Central Oregon. And they're also going to be talking about the economy, educational needs that they'll need to have for the region. And it's just going to be a great presentation. And I think it's going to be really important for everybody. a 4-year college is a big thing."

 

Sande says the event is a collaborative effort between all Central Oregon chambers - and so there will be a good variety of businesses represented.

 

Besides the business booths; there will be marketing workshops and prizes to win.

 

Senator Knopp says Jobs Bills need to be higher Priority


State Senator Tim Knopp of Bend says Republicans in the House and Senate plan to prioritize this final stage of session by pushing jobs bills.

He says there are several good ideas in Salem that could add family wage jobs in Oregon- things like giving small businesses the "Nike deal"  - and allowing some logging and wildfire prevention projects in our forests.

 

"We continue to talk about tax increases when we have 10 percent more money coming in this session- but we haven't done much to help small businesses create more private sector jobs- so we're going to work the rest of this session trying to get some action on that because we need to get Oregonians back to work."

 

Knopp also supports easier land use laws for new and expanding businesses.

 

Unemployment in Central Oregon Went Down Last Month


All three counties saw reductions in rates.  Deschutes County remains just over 10 percent and Crook County's is just over 13 percent.

 

Jefferson County actually saw the biggest reduction at 11.6 percent down from 12 percent.

 

But regional economist Damon Runberg admits that unemplyment in the region still remains too high.

 

"We're seeing all three counties drop, but our unemployment is still stubbornly high compared to the rest of the region.  Deschutes has the highest unemployment rate in the state for metro statistical areas.  Crook County remains the highest for all the counties in the state."

 

For the first time in months -- the state's unemployment rate fell from 8.4 percent to 8.2 percent.

Children in Poverty Increasing in Oregon


The latest statistics from "Children First for Oregon" -- show an additional 13-thousand children slipped into poverty.

 

In Deschutes County, more than half the district's public school children are eligible to receive free or redued school lunches.

 

Kate Moore with Deschutes County Public Health says the numbers show many people are still hurting.

 

"We're still experiencing some hard eocnomic times, so I think it's reflected in the many more chidren added to the Healthy Kids program.  It's good and bad news.  It's good news that more kids are enrolled in the program, but it's bad news their family's income qualified for the health insurance.  So we're still lagging behind many areas in our economic recovery."

 

23 percent of Oregon's children are living in poverty -- about 44 percent of the state's kids are either poor or low income.

Prescribe Burn Update


People throughout the Bend area are noticing a large plume of smoke southeast of Bend. Fire officials and 9-1-1 dispatchers have been fielding a lot of calls from concerned citizens- but they assure us that nothing has gone wrong with a planned prescribe burn off of China Hat Road.

1110 KBND news just spoke (Tuesday afternoon) with Heather Fisher who is physically on the scene - she says many people have been driving out to the burn - because they were worried.

 

"But i can understand- it's the first bit of smoke we've seen this season - it is our underburn season so it's time for prescribed burns-i'd like to let people know they probably will see more in the future. but we do have a lot of people out there (to help) and this will reduce the risk of wildfire in the future.

 

She says about 50 fire fighting crews and several engines are there to make sure that the planned burn goes well. 

She also says that they were expecting a lot of smoke from the burn - its in dense vegetation, which is wetter than usual right now.

Fisher says they may also do another burn in that area tomorrow, Wednesday.

 

Bend Fire officials says emergency centers are busy taking calls from people who are seeing the smoke and are asking citizens not to call 911 dispatchers about the fire.

 

Prescribed Burn Going On in Southern Bend on Tuesday


Fire crews started the prescribed burn around 11 a.m. on Tuesday.  

 

It is being conducted along China Hat Road between the Deschutes National Forest boundary and Horse Butte, near the Woodside Ranch Subdivision.

 

They are trying to recue fuels in that area and create a defenseible space to protect the nearby homes.

 

A lot of people are concerned about the large plumes of smoke, but the Forest Service assures us it is a controlled prescribed burn.

Armed Robber Strikes NE Bend Grocery Store


A man armed with a knife robbed a clerk at the Erickson's Thriftway grocery store in NE Bend Monday night.  But he didn't get far before he was arrested, with the help of a police dog, Haras.

 

The Bend Police Department says the robbery occurred around 9:30 p.m. at the store on  Greenwood Avenue.  The man showed a knife to a checker, got cash and ran, and was tracked to the park near the store.

 

 Bend Police spokesman Sgt. Ron Taylor says the police dog was very helpful. -

 

bite "And- in this case, it was still difficult for the officers to locate the person- he was hiding in a thicket and even with the aid of a flashlight it was hard to see the man- the color of his sweatshirt- it was really the canine and his nose- locating this individual for us."

 

The suspect is 41 year old Michael Monroe, who police say is a transcient. He resisted arrest and was bitten by the dog,  and was still being treated at St. Charles in Bend as of early Monday morning.

 

 

 

Bend Senior Center Expansion Moving Forward


The board entered into a contract to purchase a 4.5 acres parcel of land at the corner of SE 15th and Reed Market Road.

 

Parks and Rec Executive Director Don Horton will allow them to expand the nearby senior center.

 

"The board has considered a concept plan that will include some remodeling of the fooptprint plan and make it more usable and add 32,000 feet.  It will include a warm water therapy pool, a MAC gym which is a multi purpsoe gym that will allow all kinds of things like dances, basketball and large dinners."

 

The sale of bonds will start in June.

 

This is the board's second land purchase agreement for proejcts pledged in the November 2012 bond measure.

 

The expansion isn't expected to be completed for five years.

Rick Allen Back as LaPine's Interim City Manager


He just took over rom Steve Hasson -- who's last day was last Friday.

 

Allen was interim manager between 2010 and 2012 -- before the city hired Hasson.

 

He's looking forward to getting up to speed.

 

"Right now we're in the middle of budget cycles -- so I'm working with the budget officer.  Thigns are in place for the next year.  I haven't had a chance to do that.  There has been one budget hearing but there's another one next week.  I've got to get my arms around the budget and the whole financial situation."

 

Allen has said he could stay on for up to a year, but believes they could find a permanent city manager for LaPine in 6 to 8 months.

New Pioneer Memorial Hospital Construction in Prineville Approved


The approval by the Board of Directors was the final step to move the 30 million dollar project forward.

 

Pioneer Memorial CEO Bob Gomes says they've outgrown the current facility and have struggled with how to meet the community's needs.

 

"You know it's an exciting day.  What it says is St. Charles is investing in the community and going to provide healthcare now and into the foreseeable future.  The investment in the community will hopefully spur other business and some economic growth out there."

 

The new hospital will be built on 20 acres on the old Ochoco Lumber site.

 

Construction is expected to start later this year or early next year and should be done in two years.

Mental Health Screening Bill Passes Oregon House


A bill passed in the Oregon House on Monday that allows school districts do mental health screening without the pro-active approval of parents.  Some lawmakers are against Housebill 3474 because parents have to "opt out" of the mental health screening, rather than "opt in." Letters are sent to the home before the mental health screening takes place. 

 

Lawmakers hope the additional effort will identify suicidal or violent kids earlier, so they can get professional help.  Democrat Shemia Fagan of Clackamas was a "yes" vote. 

 

"To those who are concerned about kids inadvertently screened i would ask - what is the worst thing that can happen- they are inadvertently screened- they're taken to a therapist- they're fine.  alittle bit of wasted time perhaps.  but when we fail to cast a broad net and catch mental health early on what is the worst thing that can happen if they aren't screened.... just ask the parents at  Sandy Hook - Clackamas and Boston- to get the answer to that question."  

 

The bill passed 42 to 16 and moves to the Senate.  One Representative who voted against  the bill says when it comes to parental notification lawmakers need to err on the side of the parents.  All Central Oregon lawmakers voted against the bill.  

 

 

Taste of Home Bigger and Better


The Bimart Taste of Home Cooking School is Tuesday night and after taking off a year, thanks to the economy,  many businesses are excited to get involved again.

 

Casey Kaiser with Combined Communications says they are finding that businesses are feeling stronger about getting involved in events like this.

 

"There is actually a lot of excitement with the businesses that are involved with it this year. Quite a few of them have shares with us that they were disappointed that the event was off line here in Central Oregon for a year. As you know, it's a national event that travels around the country, so Central Oregonians are always really excited to have it here."

 

Kaiser says its a very encouraging sign that so many businesses are eager to join the event.

 

The Taste of Home is Tuesday at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds; doors open at 3 p.m. and the show starts at 6 p.m.  You can still buy tickets at the door.

Bend High Student Celebrated


Today will be a very special day for one Bend High student; and a proud day for Bend High.

 

Senior Kayley Torney has been chosen to receive a "Stamps Scholarship" worth up to $95,000 to attend the University of Oregon.

 

Michelle Holdway with the University of Oregon says it's an impressive accolade, and very few are given out.

 

"Well the stamps family charitable foundation is an organization that is really reaching out and working with some select institutions around the country. There are just 35 schools that are offering Stamps Scholarships and they are offering them in partnership with the schools. And what they provide are full tuition scholarships, along with room and board. And they also provide something that's a little unusual; and that is enrichment funding."

 

Holdway says that enrichment funding can be used to travel abroad to further her studies or take in internship.

 

There will be a special "signing event" at Bend High this morning at 10 a.m. where Tornay will be honored by the U of O for her achievements.

A Busy Day for Redmond Police


A Redmond resident called police late Thursday night - reporting that a shot was fired and a window was broken.

 

Police investigated and found that the shot came from the residents neighbor, Ronald Garzini, 33, who was taken into custody and charged with felon in possession of a firearm; reckless endangering and more.

 

Also in Redmond; on Friday around 3 p.m.,  Andrew Burchett, 37, tried to avoid Redmond Police after an attempted traffic stop by driving into the parking lot of Brookside Manor, an assisted living facility.

 

Burchett fled on foot, jumping into the canal to try to elude police.

 

He was taken into custody when he left the canal and is lodged in the Deschutes County Jail on a felony attempt to elude, felon in possession of a weapon and many more charges.

Meet the Candidates Monday


Six candidates are running for four positions on the Redmond School Board in May's election.

 

Monday night you have a chance to meet the candidates and question why they are running and what their views are regarding the future of Redmond.

 

Bob Perry with the Redmond Patriots, who is also in the Redmond School Board, says the community is welcome.

 

"All of our meetings are open to the public and free, so this will be the first opportunity, even before the voter pamphlets go out, to interface with the community and answer the question that people in Redmond have, and that's one of the community services that we provide for every election."

 

There will also be a discussion on the "pros" and "cons" of home schooling with a panel of home school parents.

 

The meeting is at Highland Baptist Church beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Earth Day Celebrated Saturday


Monday is the official "Earth Day,"  but it will be celebrated Saturday so everyone can enjoy the festivities.

 

Jackie Wilson with the Environmental Center says the event kicks off at 10:30 a.m. with the very popular "Procession of the Species."

 

"People are gathering on Louisiana Ave. near Troy Field and getting ready for the annual Procession of the Species Earth Day Parade. It's where we celebrate our connection to the natural world and we have lots of people dressed up as their favorite animals, plants, all sorts of great things. So it will be a really great parade."

 

Wilson says after the parade down Bond - Minnesota and Wall Streets; the fair with vendors, music and food will be on Kansas Avenue.

 

Everything begins at 10:30 in the morning and ends at 3:00 p.m.

Bend City Council to Take Up Noise Ordinance Again


In Wednesday night's Bend City Council work session, a report on changes to the City Noise Ordinance brought up a lot of discussion. Bend Police Captain Ken Stenkamp says the ordinance passed in spring of 2012 seems to be working well, especially the new program where people who plan to have an event that will deemed to be "noisy" must submit a kind of a "noise permit".

 

"The idea behind the notification really is to let the neighbors know this is going to be happening your neighborhoods, and so they will be aware. It doesn't necessarily have anything to so with denial of it, it's just to arm them with the knowledge that something's going to happen. So that they aren't surprised by it, and if they do hear a loud noise, they know what the source is."

 

Stenkamp said they are proposing some refinements to the ordinance that will try to eliminate any ambiguity, especially when it comes to decibel levels and time limits.

 

Wesley Ladd- owner of the "Horned Hand," a local bar and music venue asks that police be armed with a decibel reading meter - so that any loud music complaint could be proven.

Water Treatment Committee Planned


Wednesday night at the Bend City Council meeting - Councilors Victor Chudowsky and Sally Russell proposed forming a committee to come up with recommendations for the water treatment element of the Surface Water Improvement Project.

 

Chudowsky says a new review is needed, after so much time passing from the initial approval of the treatment plan.

 

"See if its feasible to have an alternative to the current plan for the treatment, perhaps UV or something else. But anyway, this is our plan; to appoint a committee of people, how it will operate, who would appoint the committee, the timeline."

 

The Council agreed to the committee idea, and City Manager Eric King said he would immediately issue a notice to qualified people who would like to be involved.

 

The Council will choose the committee in May - so they could begin work immediately.

Bend Officials Taking Time to Find New Fire Chief


City of Bend officials are going to take their time in finding a replacement for Bend Fire Chief Larry Huhn  when he retires at the end of the month.

 

Four candidates were interviewed and participated in a meet and greet with city residents last week.

 

City spokesman Justin Finestone says while a decision will be slow in coming - there is someone to step into the chief's shoes until a decision is made.

 

"One of his Deputy Chiefs, Doug Koellermeier is going to step in and be interim chief while we complete the process. Obviously, it's a very important hire for the city, so we're not going to rush it; we're going to make sure we get the right candidate for bend at the right time."

 

Finestone says the hiring committee will meet again soon, and we could possibly get more information on the direction they are moving by next week.

Bike Program Aims to Curb Road Deaths


Commute Options of Central Oregon is beginning a program that will hopefully reduce the number of bike - car injuries and deaths.

 

Spokesperson Kim Curley says the program "Towards Zero Deaths" is a lofty goal - especially in an environment where there are some very extreme views on rights to use the roads.

 

"There are extremes on both ends. But the reality in our country, and especially the west, a lot of our cities were built up in the era of the automobile. And so they're very car-centric and that does create challenges for people who are not in a vehicle."

 

Curley says they are beginning a public messaging campaign for bikers as well as drivers - hoping to clarify rules and rights of the road.

 

In May- they will hold their first "Bike and Pedestrian Count" to see if all the bikeways and walkways are being used as designed.

Bend Company Wins Big Award to Take Product to Market


A local start-up company was just awarded 220 thousand dollars to help company leaders take the product to market on a national level.

JettStream makes a special device that allows asthma patients to get rid of a tough to use nebulizer mask.

Co-founder Matt Smith of Bend says the idea was born out of a huge need...

 

"What's the problem?- so the problem is treating children who have asthma - children wearing a mask- children don't like to put anything on their face...require nebulizer treatments..."

 

The award from the Southern Oregon Angel Investors Conference is a big boost- but they still need about 250 thousand dollars to properly launch the product. Smith says the invention could also help reduce a large number of emergency room visits from asthma patients who find it difficult to manage their asthma. 

 

Company co-founder Sarah Cota has a son, Jett,  with asthma.  She says before she started using the "Jett Pak" type invention it was tough to manager her son's asthma, especially when he was 2 or 3.  She says one year she went to the Emergency Room 18 times.  Smith says this could help cut down on what people in the industry refer to as "frequent flyers", that's people who visit the emergency room on a very regular basis.

  

Oregon AG Warns of Bombing Scammers


In the wake of the tragic Boston Marathon bombings, Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum is warning Oregon consumers to be on the lookout for phony charities soliciting funds for the victims.

 

Scam artists are becoming increasingly adept at exploiting disasters for personal gain. According to news accounts, a fake Twitter account appeared almost immediately after the bombings in Boston called @_BostonMarathon offering to donate $1 for every retweet. The Twitter account was quickly suspended after users warned the account was fake.

 

“Scammers came out in force after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, after Hurricane Katrina, and after Superstorm Sandy,” said Ellen Klem, Director of Consumer Outreach and Education. “They’ll try once again after Monday’s senseless bombing. Don’t let them prosper off the tragedy. Be generous, but skeptical.”

 

Consumers should remember the following tips: 
 

·Do not give out personal information such as credit card or bank account numbers over the phone.

 

·Checks should always be made payable to the organization not the person collecting the donation.

 

·Beware of callers who want your money fast. When solicited by phone, always ask the caller to send you written materials about the charity. No legitimate organization will insist that you donate immediately

 

·Do not donate cash. Legitimate charities will be pleased to receive a contribution by check. Don’t send contributions with a “runner,” by wire or overnight parcel pick-up service.

 

·Be sure you are contributing to a legitimate organization registered with the Oregon Department of Justice by searching the Department’s online database at www.oregonconsumer.gov or by calling 971-673-1880. You can also visit www.guidestar.org, a national clearinghouse of information about charities and their performance.  

 

The Oregon Department of Justice, a national leader in policing charities, licenses and regulates more than 18,000 non-profits. In 2012, the department took legal action against more than 20 non-profits for misleading solicitations.

 

Anyone who thinks they may have been contacted by a scammer should call the DOJ’s Consumer Protection Hotline at 1-877-877-9392 or go to the Oregon Department of Justice web site: www.oregonconsumer.gov.

Walden On the Boston Bombs


U.S. Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.) today delivered remarks on the House floor about the acts of terrorism in Boston yesterday. Below is a transcript of his remarks: 

 

“Mr. Speaker, I rise today on behalf of the people of Oregon’s Second District to offer my deepest sympathies to the families of the victims of the senseless act of terrorism in Boston.

 

“Scripture tells us “Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted.” Our prayers go to those who lost loved ones and to the injured as they recover so that they may be comforted. 

 

“Our thanks go to the first responders and good Samaritans who selflessly assisted the victims yesterday. That’s what Americans do—they help their fellow men and women in a time of need. That’s a common bond that unites us.

 

“Boston is the birthplace of the American Revolution, the cradle of liberty for our nation. That spirit of freedom and brotherhood lives on in us as Americans, and brings us closer together in our grief. 

 

“As Americans, we will care for the victims and their families. We will ensure that justice is done to those behind this cowardly attack. And we will emerge as a nation stronger than ever before.”

 

 

Two Injured in Rollover


La Pine Firefighters extracted two La Pine residents from their pickup after it slid on a snowy Highway 97 striking another car and rolling into a tree.

 

Just after 8:30 Tuesday morning, about 7 miles north of La Pine, Stanley Stolp, 68, was driving north on Highway 97 when he lost control of the pickup and hit a car driven by Laura Moulden, 32,  of Redmond.

 

La Pine Fire Chief Mike Stupkis says the pickup rolled, crashed into a tree, resting on its side and pinning Stolp and his wife, Linda, 65, inside.

 

The Stolps were taken to St. Charles Bend with non-life threatening injuries; Moulden was not injured.

 

Highway 97 was closed for about 45 minutes.

Redmond Woman Escapes Injury Crossing the Boston Marathon Finish Line Minutes Before the Explosions


Her husband Stefan was at the finish line when his wife crossed -- just ten minutes before the explosions.

 

"I mean it's surreal in the sense of processing the images of the day -- thinking of the people we saw -- hoping and praying they're o.k.  My wife was really shaken up.  She had just been in that area and hearing what happened and the persepctive of seeing those faces of people who had rooted her on."

 

It was a local community effort to help raise the funds so Jen could run in the marathon.

 

Her employer, Century 21 paid her registration fee and other businsses and individuals help fund her trip to and from Boston.

Redmond Woman Escapes Injury Crossing the Boston Marathon Finish Line Minutes Before the Explosions


Her husband Stefan was at the finish line when his wife crossed -- just ten minutes before the explosions.

 

"I mean it's surreal in the sense of processing the images of the day -- thinking of the people we saw -- hoping and praying they're o.k.  My wife was really shaken up.  She had just been in that area and hearing what happened and the persepctive of seeing those faces of people who had rooted her on."

 

It was a local community effort to help raise the funds so Jen could run in the marathon.

 

Her employer, Century 21 paid her registration fee and other businsses and individuals help fund her trip to and from Boston.

Lynn Lundquist Will Be Remembered at Service


Tuesday hundreds of people are expected to come out and remember former house speaker and community member Lynn Lundquist. His service is at The Powell Butte Christian Church. Pastor Glenn Bartnik has known Lundquist since the 1970's and will deliver the service –Bartnik was there at the home that morning when Lundquist died and says today, the family is coping...  

 

"You know when a man dies suddenly it's tough to get your mind around it- but coming together and supporting and encouraging one another they are remembering the good times - and of course there are always tears because of the loss."

 

The service will be held at 11 a.m. Memorial contributions may be made to "The Kids Center" earmarked for Crook County or for "The Special Olympics" through Whispering Pines Funeral Home in Prineville.  Lundquist was the Oregon House Speaker in 1997, and founded the Oregon Business Association.  He was 78.

 

Bartnik says Lynn had a heart as "big as the outdoors".

Former Oregon House Speaker Lynn Lundquist Will Be Laid to Rest on Tuesday


Lundquist died unexpectedly at his home last week.

 

Lundquist's service will be Tuesday at Powell Butte Christian Church in Powell Butte starting at 11 A.M.

 

The family is asking for contributions to the Kids Center earmarked for Crook County and/or The Special Olympics in memory of Lundquist.

 

Deschutes Public Library's Novel Idea Kicks Off


This is the 10th year of the program that picks a novel the whole community can read together.

 

Library Director Todd Dunkelberg say this year's selection is a popular one.

 

"This year's author is Eowyn Ivey an author and columnist from Alaska.  She's written a novel called "Snow Child" and its based on a folk tale from Russia."

 

For the next three weeks, the library will hold free cultural programs, book discussions and art openings on the book.

 

The author, Eowyn Ivey will be in Bend on Friday May 3rd at the Tower Theater and Saturday May 4th at Ridgeview High School in Redmond.

 

The events are free and open to the public.

Rick Allen Will Again Serve as LaPine's Interim City Manager


He held that position between 2010 and 2012 before the city hired Steve Hasson for the post.  Hasson resigned last month.

 

LaPine Mayor Ken Mullenex says Allen will once again commute.

 

"Yes, Rick still lives in Madras.  He'll be commuting.  He'll work probably less than 30 hours a week.  He'll be working on high priority items as there are state budget deadlines coming up.  He won't serve more than a year and we'll put a new city manager in place."

 

The city plans to use the League of Oregon Cities again to hopefully find a new permanent city manager in the next year.

 

Crook County Considering Going Smoke-Free


The county's health department is pushing to make that an ordinance.

 

Crook County Commissioner Ken Fahlgren says a recent survey of 600 residents gave them insight into how locals feel.

 

"Looked to be 70 percent in favor of the ordinance of not smoking on county properties.  Were most people who spoke up in favor of the policy?  Yes, most of them were.  We do have a group in town that believe we're taking away their liberties -- and we have to listen to that."

 

The county commissioners held a public hearing last week and most in attendance spoke in favor of going smoke-free at county properties.

 

Commissioners will make a final decsion on Apri l 24th.

 

 

SB611 Could Protect Kids from Allergic Reactions


Senate Bill 611, now in the Oregon House of Representatives would alloy schools to maintain a supply of "Epi Pens"  (epinephrine auto-injectors) for children who have an allergic reaction to food - insects or other substances.

 

State Representative John Huffman of the Dalles says he's heard testimony over the years of children show suffer or become dangerously ill  - and having emergency help makes sense.

 

"I think it's just a necessary, but a smart move. I do have struggles with the liability for the teacher and the school district; but I think parents are maybe going to have to be willing to sign waivers to allow this to happen so their children can have immediate access to the necessary medications."

 

Huffman says so far, the bill has been approved by the Senate and now it's in the House Education Committee for review - but there's been no opposition to the bill.

 

The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America is asking Oregon legislators to pass the bill - saying the "Epi Pen" is a quick and inexpensive remedy in case of an allergic emergency.

Whisnant Stands Up for Intellectual Property Rights


Thursday morning, the Oregon House of Representatives unanimously approved "House Memorial 2"  that supports efforts to protect American jobs and the economy. 

 

Representative Gene Whisnant of Sunriver, who carried the Memorial to the floor of the House says the sale of counterfeit products results in job and earning losses and can be a threat to public safety. 

 

"It’s just a simple statement about how the legislature supports efforts to protect intellectual property rights. And also to stop counterfeiting of products. It’s a big drain on the economy and a big drain on jobs."

 

Whisnant says House Memorial 2 demonstrates their support of combating intellectual piracy and the counterfeiting of intellectual property like pharmaceutical drugs, films, music apparel and more.

Oregon Congressmen Fighting for More Forest Jobs


A proposal in the U-S House of Representatives to change the management of federal lands in Oregon could mean many new long term jobs.

 

Congressman Greg Walden says the struggling economy, coupled with restrictions on forest management has devastated Oregonians.

 

"Of the 14 forested counties I represent, 10 currently face double digit unemployment. 8 of these counties over the last 5 years have had an average poverty level of 14% or greater. How can we let this happen to our rural forested communities? There appears to be a direct connection between the loss of mills and jobs and a substantial increase in poverty."

 

Walden, along with Oregon Representatives Kurt Schrader and Peter DeFazio testified at a House Subcommittee hearing Thursday about how the lack of logging has affected the state.

 

They have a plan that would turnover forest management of federal lands to a public board that would use federal laws as they apply to private and state forests.

Two Small Towns Could Become One


Two small eastern Oregon towns are exploring the possibility of combining to become one city.

 

The Burns-Hines Task Force met for the first time last week to begin the study of a joint effort; residents of Harney County were also included in discussions.

 

The Burns Times-Herald reports the idea to consolidate is a financial one - studies of cities that are the same size of a combined Burns-Hines would spend considerably less than the individual cities.

 

Burns has a population of about 2800 people and Hines has about 1550 residents, and both cities are shrinking in population.

 

Governor Kitzhaber's Office is behind consolidation of services in the state and there are bills already proposed and money in the budget to help cities and counties coordinate services.

 

The Burns-Hines Task Force is currently looking for public input about a possible consolidation.

Redmond State of the City Address


Redmond Mayor George Endicott said in his state of the city address Wednesday that the city is seeing slow and steady progress. 

 

"In terms of budget, we've stabilized, I think the bleeding has stopped. We lost, over the last 5 years, about 13% of our property tax revenue, but that looks like it's flat now.  We doubled our residential building permits from 11 to 12, so that's a good sign. We have some commercial construction going on. You know, we're seeing the glimmers of a recovery."

 

Endicott says they are focusing on two major themes: that they are open for business and are family friendly.

 

And he says they are working to prove that by rezoning some land to encourage new businesses to move to Redmond and bring family wage jobs.

 

He adds that their downtown road construction project is well ahead of schedule and it's looking very good.

Local Home Loan gives some a Second Chance


 

The Bank of the Cascades is launching a home loan program that focuses on people who may not be able to get a home loan anywhere else right now.  It's called the "New Beginnings Home Loan Program" and it's for hard-working, responsible people to put them back into homes after a devastating circumstance that has caused damage to their credit.

The Bank of the Cascades spokesman Chip Reeves spoke to 1110 KBND on Tuesday about the program, he says the Bank will hold the paper. 

 

"And what happened to central oregon over the past five years- central oregon was greatly affected-and Bank of the Cascades was too - this is our way of giving back - now it's our turn to help."

 

To be eligible - applicants must have experienced job loss,  under-employment or other job-related or income issues.  The bank will also consider people who've had a medical or health related event or the death of a primary wage earner during the five years starting on January 1st - 2007

 

Here is the full news release from BOC:

 

*************************************************************************


New home lending program designed to help repair credit

Bend, Oregon - April 4, 2013 - Central Oregon residents who have lost their homes or filed for bankruptcy as a result of job loss, medical expenses or other related circumstances may be eligible for a fresh start through a new loan program announced this week by Bank of the Cascades. The Bank's New Beginnings Home Lending Program is designed to provide home loans to qualified borrowers whose credit has been damaged as a result of the recent economic crisis.

To be eligible for a New Beginnings Home Loan, applicants must have experienced job loss, loss of income, underemployment after job loss, reduction of wages or hours, a medical or health related event or the death of a primary wage earner between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. These events must also have resulted in foreclosure, bankruptcy, deed in lieu of foreclose or a short sale that impacted the applicant's credit.

"A serious medical illness or loss of a job can be devastating to a person's credit. We created this program to provide a second chance for our neighbors in Central Oregon," said Terry Zink, President and CEO for Bank of the Cascades. "Our goal is to help them repair their credit, rebuild their assets and take advantage of the record low interest rates that are available right now."

According to Zink, local residents should be the first to benefit from the Bank's recent return to profitability.

"When we are successful our communities are successful. We're looking for creative ways to assist our neighbors and customers along the road to economic recovery. We believe this program is one way we can do that," said Zink.

"Current Government loan underwriting requirements exclude borrowers who have experienced foreclosure, bankruptcy, short sale or deed in lieu of foreclosure from re-entering the home purchase market for two to seven years," explained Chip Reeves, EVP & Chief Banking Officer for Bank of the Cascades.

"We need to stand behind our neighbors who have come across extraordinary circumstances," said Reeves. "We're trying to remove some of the barriers that make it difficult for them to recover and rebuild."

A New Beginnings loan can total up to $417,000 and is based on adjustable interest rates. The loans will only apply to single family, owner occupied residences. Second homes, multi-family homes, prefabricated or modular homes, or investment properties will not be eligible for financing through this program.

For more information about the New Beginnings Home Lending Program, contact (541) 385-9933.

Bank of the Cascades is the principal subsidiary of Cascade Bancorp (NASDAQ: CACB). Headquartered in Bend, Oregon, Bank of the Cascades delivers personalized relationship banking, competitive financial products, and advanced technology applied for the convenience of customers. Founded in 1977, Bank of the Cascades offers full-service community banking through 31 branches in Central Oregon, Southern Oregon, Portland/Salem and Idaho's Treasure Valley. Throughout its history, the bank has been recognized for its long-standing tradition of corporate philanthropy. Recently, Deschutes County Children & Families Commission also recognized the Bank for their family friendly practices. For more information, visit www.botc.comor contact Bank of the Cascades at 541-617-3500 or 877-617-3400.
###


 

 

Two Oregonians on the Louisville Womens Team


There were two prominent Oregon sisters playing for the Louisville Women's Basketball Team in the lop-sided 93-60 loss to the U-Conn Huskies Tuesday night. 

 

The Schimmel sisters; Shoni and Jude grew up on the Umatilla Indian Reservation near Pendleton.

 

The community went all out in support of their "girls".

 

Gary George, spokesman for the Wildhorse Casino where they held a big viewing party says the Schimmel sisters reaching such a high level is awe-inspiring to Native American kids, and the sisters have done a lot to help tribal kids know that can achieve anything they want.

 

"They were born here in Pendleton, Oregon, and are members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indians and grew up here on the reservation. So we're pretty excited about their achievements and contributions to the success of the Louisville team. I think it really sends a great message to our tribal youth; you can do it, you can achieve it. We have some great athletes, but you just have to put forth the effort."

 

George says he hopes to help plan a celebration, just to honor the girls’ achievements when they get a chance to come home.

Bend Student Returns from Momentous Trip


Updating you on a story we brought you last month; a local Bend High student with Down's Syndrome has returned from scaling Mt. Everest to the Base Camp.

 

Eli Reimer's dad, Justin says the climb went very well and it brought a whole new sense of pride and accomplishment to Eli.

 

"Honestly, it was so full of all sorts of memories and most of them very sweet memories of Eli on the trail and our entire team being his community of support and them really spurring him on. The whole thing was amazing."

 

Reimer says their Sherpa guides were also very impressed with Eli's enthusiasm and stamina,  as they had never been with a disabled person before.

 

"For them, it was a totally different experience. And they were very nervous at first and didn't know how they should interact with him, and didn't know how they could communicate with him. And it was neat to see that as we progressed on the trail, they began to develop a close relationship with Eli. That was powerful to see the impact with that culture, simply by Eli being Eli and being so kind and loving to these men that were leading us that it was a very neat side of things as far as the impact on a culture."

 

Their efforts raised about $94,000 for the Elisha Foundation, a group that helps bring education and comfort to families with disabled kids.

Allergy Season is Upon Us


Allergy season seems to have hit us a bit early this year, thanks to a mild winter.

 

Experts say - that you may be doomed to sneeze.

 

Dr. Adam Williams, an allergist at Bend Memorial Clinic says you might thank your parents if you suffer from allergies.

 

“that has to do with our genetic predisposition.  So people who are going to develop allergies are destined to do so by the genes they inherit from their parents. And only some people have those genes, about 40% of the people have those genes.”

 

Williams says allergies happen when antibodies in the nose and throat react to pollen and dust - and springtime is the worst - because all of the trees and flowers are shooting bursts of pollen into the air, and any slight breeze can send you running for the tissues.

 

In Central Oregon - juniper is the biggest problem, but there are some very effective products on the market that can help you cope.

 

“I just want to make sure that people understand that there’s lots of good options out there for their primary care doctor or primary provider or allergist if the need arises. And to not suffer needlessly. There’a a lot of options that can help with allergy symptom control.”

Prineville's Pioneer Hospital Signs Off on Building a New Facility


The current facility was built in the 1950's -- and it would cost more to remodel it -- about 49 million compared to building a new hospital  at 30 million.

 

Pioneer Memorial CEO Bob Gomes says the board recommended the membership build a new facility and members agreed.

 

"In order to do what we need to do in healthcare, it would be real expensive to remodel the Prineville Hospital because you need to run the hospital as you remodel.  The Board's recommendation is to build on a new site which is less expensive and gives us moe flexibility."

 

The hospital is considering two sites in Prineville -- one located in the Ironhorse subdivision and the other at the old Ochocco Lumber site.

 

If approved, by the St. Charles Board of Directors next week, the new facility woudl be completed around January 2015.

Mt Bachelor Improvement Plan To Go Forward


The appeal period for the ski area improvement plan has passed with no objections.

 

This means their ten year plan for significant improvements can get underway.

 

Andy Goggins with Mt. Bachelor tells us what we can expect in the first phase.

 

"We've got a list of projects for the first four years.  New lifts and terrain on the SE side of the mountain.  We'll be adding summer activites that include downhill mountain biking and zip lines so."

 

The other phases will include adding a new base lodge and turning the existing lodge into a kids center.  The ski hill also plans to expand some of the chair lifts from four to six passenger lifts.

Planning for a Silver Tsunami


We are living longer and that's a big reason behind the explosion of Alzheimer's cases in the coming decades.

 

Dr. Richard MacDonell. 

 

"I think as people are living logner we are seeing more age related diseases that we weren't seeing 30 to 40 years ago when individuals had shorter life spans.  People are living with Alzheimers, dementia, Parkinson's and osteoporosis."

 

Alzheimer's is a devastating brain disease that eventually takes away a person's memory and cognitive abilities.

 

Adult children of aging parents are being forced to care for their eldelyl parents -- while they are raising their own children.

 

Ali Davidson is a senior advocate who used to own an in-home care facility in Bend.

She says families have to have the conversation on their final wishes before it's too late.

 

"We can't parent our parent.  You have to establish a peer to peer relationship with your parents.  They'll respond must better to a peer better than a child."

 

It may be an uncomfortable conversation, but an important to make sure your parent's wishes are realized.

 

U.S. Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon Talks Gun Control


U.S. Senator Ron Wyden told the City Club of Central Oregon lat week he supports reasonable gun control that works.

 

"It is time for a background check system that works.  And a background check system to me, the standards should have sufficient checks so people with serious mental problems cannot get weapons - ought to be a fundamental quesiton."

 

Wyden does not support an assault weapons ban because too many guns could be considered assault weapons.

 

He does support some magazine limits and believes mental health has to be front and center of any gun conotrol legislation.

American Airlines Expectations for New Direct L.A. Flights


Eugene as well will start offering the flights on June 12th.

 

A massive central Oregon effort raising nearly half a million dollars in travel vouchers and revenue guarantees help entive American Airlines to offer the direct flights.

 

Dale Morris with American Airlines says he expects travelers will use the flights for business and leisure.

 

"I think what we expect from this region is a huge business market.  We think this is a great opportunity to connect with the L.A. market for business.  But we also expect Disneyland could attract a lot of leisure travelers and more opportuniteis as well."

 

The Central Oregon Visitors Association is planning an extensive advertising campaign to draw southern California people to central Oregon.

Four Vying for Bend Fire Chief Position


There are four finalists for the city of bend fire chief position - and you'll have an opportunity to meet them this Thursday.

 

Al Gillespie is the former Fire Chief of the North Las Vegas Fire Department.

 

Gordon Sletmoe is the Deputy Chief of Medford Fire and Rescue.

 

John Staley is the Fire Chief of Thornton, Colorado and Nate Trauernicht  is the Fire Chief of the University of California- Davis Fire Department.

 

City spokesman Justin Finestone says they received 83 applications that were culled down to these four candidates.

 

Current Fire Chief Larry Huhn will be retiring at the end of April after 30 years of service.

 

The reception to meet the four candidates will be at the Riverhouse on Thursday at 5:30 p.m.

BLM Has Great Summer Volunteer Jobs


The Prineville Bureau of Land Management is looking for some volunteers that love to camp.

 

Spokeswoman Lisa Clark says the want to staff several of their more popular campgrounds with "camp hosts" to help maintain sites and provide visitors with an "anchor".

 

"You know really we are looking for people with great communication skills. You’re actually out there setting an example as a model camper; you're helping greet and provide information to visitors. So just being comfortable talking with strangers and helping people out is the best asset we can ask for."

 

Clark says they are looking for about a two-month commitment - working about 20 hours a week - in exchange for free camping.

 

They are looking for hosts at the John Day - Lower Deschutes and Crooked Rivers campsites.

 

Contact the Prineville B-L-M for more information - we have a link to the website with this story at 11-10 KBND - dot-com.

 

http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/prineville/files/Camp_Hosts.pdf

Childhood Obesity and Bullying can be Reduced by more time in the forest


Central Oregon has one of the very few "Children's Forests" in the country and two events in connection with the forest are planned for this weekend.  Katie Chipko with the Deschutes Children's Forest says as children become more obese and more addicted to their computers and cell phones- its more important that ever before to get children into the woods.

 

"There is some scientific evidence behind this that time spent in nature will reduce obesity- anxiety – ADHD ...many of us know so well how important being outside is to our physical and mental well-being.”

 

Chipko says even students who tend to bully others seem calmer by spending more time in the woods.  And some kids who may be shy in the classroom seem to come alive while out in nature.

 

Friday, April 5th,  the Deschutes Children's Forest is showing a special film screening event of the award winning documentary, "Play Again."  at 7:00 P.M. at the Old Stone Church in Bend. And on Saturday,  there's a free event at Shevlin Park.  "Discover Nature Day!" is from 9:30 to 1:30, and it’s for students from kindergarten age through 8th grade along with parents or guardians.

Guns in Schools is a big Topic in Salem


Members of the Oregon School Boards Association will testify in Salem Friday in favor of allowing local districts to determine their own gun policies,  related to school safety.  Redmond School District Superintendent Mike McIntosh likes the idea of local control. He’s he's already heard from several parents on both sides.

 

"There are familes who've told me that if there's guns in schools by laymen- i won't send my kids to schools- and there are others who say if they don't get guns in school I won't send my kids - so there's a lot of controversy for how that goes- so i think in the end local control is the right way to go." 

 

McIntosh says one problem with allowing volunteers or teachers to be armed is that the insurance company for most Oregon School Districts is reluctant to cover that liability.

The Oregon School Boards Association testimony is planned for hearings at the state Capitol on four gun-safety bills before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

 

 

American Airlines Approves Direct Flights to Los Angeles from Central Oregon


American Airlines has given the final go ahead and made the announcement at the Redmond Airport Thursday.

 

Deschutes County Commissioner Alan Unger spoke at the press conference and told the crowd this is going to be a huge asset for the region.

 

"So the airport is the second economic generator.  I don't know what  the number one generator is, you can fight over that.  But without air services getting you in and out of the area, number one wouldn't be number one.  This to me is one of the most important things we will achieve in 2013."

 

The new daily flights to L.A. will start on June 12th.  The flights will leave for  L.A. just after 8 A.M. and will return to Redmond just before 9 P.M.

 

You can start booking flights and the American Airlines website starting this Sunday.

 

Second Annual TEDX Bend Saturday


It's a smaller local version of the international TED conferences that highlight people with innovative ideas. 

 

TED stands for technology, entertainment and design.

 

Molly Schofield is emceeing the event for a second year.

 

"But often times in Bend we move here for the lifestyle and we may be out on the soccer sidelines and don't know what our neighbors and friends are doing.  There are so many intelligent people here. And this event highlights ideas that may be the next start up or next non profit locally."

 

TEDX Bend gets underway Saturday at Summit High School starting at 1 P.M.

 

Tickets are sold out for the auditorium, but are avaialble for the live stream.

Legendary Film Critic Roger Ebert Dead at 70


Legendary film critic Roger Ebert died Thursday at the age of 70, just 2 days after announcing he was taking a "leave of presence."

 

Ray Solley, Executive Director of the Tower Theatre says his first job out of college was producing Siskel and Ebert's premiere show "Sneak Previews" back in 1976.

 

"I think of it as an end of an era when Gene died, it was like half of the great team that revolutionized some criticism on television, that we were honored and gifted to be a part of; that's gone, but there's always Roger. And then when he announced that he'd been re-diagnosed with recurring cancer, he was going to sort of back away for day-in day-out work. And then 48 hours later you get the news; it's not just depressing, it's just really disappointing and sobering."

 

Ebert was diagnosed with thyroid cancer in 2002, and later developed a type of tongue cancer that required surgery that left him unable to speak or eat.

 

Solley said his fondest memories are that Ebert was the fastest typist he ever knew, and as far as getting out his column, he could do it with no revisions; he loved the movies that much.  And he was ann expert of point out quirky things that happen in almost every movie.

 

"He was a great writer, and his books are wonderful. When he points those out, it forever changes they way you watch a movie. And when those moments happen, you don't think of 'Oh, wow, I'm smart;' you think of 'Oh wow, Roger nailed it.'"

 

Funeral and memorial services are unknown at this time.

Construction Worker with Equipment Falls into Big Hole


An earth mover carrying dirt for fill in a 30 foot hole toppled backward into the hole, injuring the unidentified Taylor Northwest employee driving it.

 

The accident happened just before 2 p.m. Thursday afternoon at the construction site on Brosterhous Road near Murphy Road - bringing Bend Fire crews out to the scene.

 

Captain Don Segel describes what they needed to do.

 

"We stabilized the truck. We tied it so it wouldn't move; attached it to equipment with straps. and then we used our aerial ladder and we went in - took men in there to stabilize the patient; and then we had out aerial ladder down into the hole below grade and then we loaded the patient onto the platform of the aerial ladder and extracted him that way and then into the ambulance."

 

Apparently- the equipment operator began backing up with a load of dirt to fill in the hole and for some reason- was unable to stop and fell into the hole.

 

The unidentified man was taken to St. Charles Bend with his injuries and we have not been able to verify his status at this time.

Bend City Council Ups and Downs


There was a sharp division of opinions at Wednesday night’s bend city council meeting on, what else: the Water Public Facility Plan.

 

Up for vote with the Council was an amended "Goal 11" of the P-F-P in response to an Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals (LUBA) Remand Order.

 

Councilor Doug Knight quickly spoke up that there was no way he would vote to approve the ordinance.

 

"I think the current PFP flies in the face of the Oregon Revised Statutes; wherein it's currently required that we currently inventory our existing our current water infrastructure as well as correctly time project accordingly. And I don't believe that the existing piping infrastructure has been appropriately and thoroughly analyzed for its level of service and health."

 

But Victor Chudowsky says after giving much thought to the project, felt that the timing is now to act to replace an 87 year old pipe they know is already leaking.

 

"Why wait for some occurrence to happen, when the opportunity to replace, again, an 87 year old pipe, that we do know for a fact is leaking, now at less expense than doing so in the future. That’s the way I look at it."

 

The ordinance passed 4 to 3 with Councilors Barram - Capell - Ramsay and Chudowsky voting "yes."

 

Also- the Council considered a “tune up” to building height ordinances.

 

The Bend City Council had a long discussion about a revision of the development code regarding building heights in downtown Bend, and whether to allow for a variance of over 35 feet.

 

Although the Council had given preliminary approval to the changes; Councilors Sally Russell and Marc Capell wanted the council omit part of the wording about building height restrictions because there was some public objection to a height variance.

 

Marc Capell:  "This is a substantial question we all don't agree on. So throwing it through as a "tune up", does a disservice to the community.  And I think whether you're in favor of the variance or not, having it in a "tune up" is misrepresentation and we ought to start from scratch on this particular question."

 

Russell,Capell and Mayor Jim Clinton want to re-open the subject to public comment, and reconsider part of the ordinance at a later date.

 

But the Council passes the revised ordinance 4 to 3.

 

 

Finally – the Northwest Crossing Storage Facility Objection:

 

The Bend City Council voted on an item that, at their last meeting garnered plenty of public comment in opposition.

 

A proposed storage facility in the Northwest Crossing area had many residents upset that the project was getting approval without their voices heard.

 

But David Ford spoke on behalf of the applicant saying the developer met with the residents about the proposal and an agreement was worked out to everyone's satisfaction.

 

"The applicant has taken the initiative and met with the property owners and the potential developer of the property. Convinced the developer to move the storage facility to another site and then met with the neighbors to address any concerns on any potential other uses that could take place on the property."

 

All of the Councilors noted that it was refreshing to see everyone working together to solve an issue and they unanimously voted to approve some zoning changes in the northwest crossing overlay zone.

Adult Jail to Get Mini-Expansion


It looks like there will be some expansion of the Deschutes County Jail in the near future,  as the County Commissioners vote to bond for a portion of the money needed to expand the adult jail by about 144 beds.

 

Commissioner tony debone says it's not a General Obligation Bond; rather the money will come in the form of a "loan" to increase jail space.

 

"This is one of those long-term things. We determined we need more jail beds many years ago. The citizens did vote "no" on a $40-million expansion. And now, at this point, we're going to do an $11-million expansion; just add some beds, use the existing kitchen, laundry facilities, and connect it to the existing facility just so we have more room for people in jail."

 

DeBone says the County will pay back the $8.3-million over 20 to 25 years.

 

The Board unanimously approved the action.

Tom Anderson Chosen as New Deschutes County Administrator


Interim County Administrator Tom Anderson can now drop the "interim" from his title.

 

Today the Deschutes County Board of Commissioners unanimously chose Tom Anderson for the permanent position.

 

Board Chair Alan Unger says they had 33 applicants and whittled those down to five well qualified candidates.

 

"We determined that tom's set of skills equaled the others; and that his knowledge and awareness of Deschutes County was an important factor too."

 

Unger says Anderson been working for the county for over 15 years; most recently as the Director of Community Development.

Bend Athlete Travels to Salem to Testify


Ski Racer and national softball athlete Jenna Sneva of Bend went to Salem on Tuesday to push for a bill that would help protect kids involved in club sports.

She has 12 concussions- mostly "knock-out" ones she received while playing in sports-  in her case she says the coaches said to just keep going...

 

"As an athlete i looked up to my coach for wisdom - but they believed that when something  hurt - the pain  was just weakness leaving the body."

 

She tells her story on a website called - "taking it head-on".  The Senate Bill would mandate free- online training on concussions for coaches and others involved in club sports- it now moves to the Senate floor for a vote.

State Senator Tim Knopp of Bend is sponsoring the bill.  He says there is no cost because the online training is free.  

Anti Fraud Bill Sails Through Senate Committee


A Medicaid anti-fraud bill unanimously passed through the Oregon Senate Health Care and Human Services Committee - that could potentially save the state tens of millions of dollars each year. 

 

With Senator Tim Knopp's leadership, SB 753 already has 18 bipartisan sponsors in the Senate and now heads to the floor for a vote.

 

He says the current system operates on a "pursuit and chase" model, where they find the fraud after the money is paid out.

 

"Talking about thousands and thousands of payments on a monthly basis. And so we want to make sure that through current database technology and technology that exists today, that they can use that to run it through the system before the payments go out."

 

Knopp says there are already companies the state can work with that use  programs to stop a fraudulent claim before it's paid, potentially saving the state millions.

PERS Bills DOA?


State Representative Mike McLane of Powell Butte says all PERS reform bills with the exception of one - are being snuffed out by the speaker of the house. Republican McLane - who is the house minority leader - says Tina Kotek visited the Republican caucus earlier this week to explain how she would handle pers bills. 

 

"She indicated that she had reviewed all the bills and deemed Senate Bill 822 as the best and the most balanced and didn't see the need to review other bills-  it's certainly isn't what we want but it's what the voters gave us and it's our job to point out the differences - and ask moderate Democrats to join us- but certainly ask Oregonians to stand up and demand reasonableness and the right policy."

 

McLane says the Democrat-backed plan keeps a cost of living increase in place for former ducks coach Mike Belotti- who gets 42 thousand a month from his PERS account.  McLane was a guest Tuesday on the Lars Larson show - which airs from noon to 3 on 11-10 KBND.

Local Nonprofits Fear Housebill 2001


A group of Central  Oregon non-profits is speaking out on a Housebill that would get rid of most itemized tax deductions on the state return.  State Representative Jason Conger of Bend met with 30 non-profits on Rriday to see how they could be impacted by losing this popular deduction.  Conger says even a talked about cap on itemized deductions at 50 thousand dollars could have a big impact.

 

"Again, the message that I took away is that even the cap would be very detrimental - many have had to make cuts over the last four years- deep cuts and at a time when they continue to see more need.”

 

The non-profit groups ranging from The Environmental Center - to non-profits that serve veterans, children and the elderly signed a statement opposing Housebill 2001.

Conger says this is a priority bill of speaker Tina Kotek, so it could be pushed heavily this session.

Sisters City Manager Resigns


The City Council accepted Eileen Stein's resignation after 11 years on the job.

 

The vote was 3 to 2 -- but those who voted to get rid of Stein refuse to comment on why.

 

Sisters City Councilor David Asson is one of the two councilors who voted in favor of keeping Stein.

 

"Yes, I'm upset.  Yes, it's silliness.  I'm a retired CPA., 76 years old and I've been through these kinds of things before, but there was always logic.  It's absolute ... It's going to hurt our little city.  These idiots and you can quote me . are tearing us apart again."

 

Eileen Stein is gone immediately and got a 100-thousand dollar severance package.

 

The current Director of Public Works in Sisters, Paul Vertagna, will step in and do the city manager's job on an interim basis.

 

Last year the Sisters Council back then nearly fired Stein, but a public outcry saved her job.

 

Representative Huffman Supports Expansion of Nike Bill


State Representative John Huffman has co-sponsored the legislation.

 

"One of the promises when I voted for the Nike bill back in December, is to let the voters know I think its fair policy to allow Nike to have that.  And what's fair for Nike is fair for small business in Oregon."

 

Both the State House and Senate have bills allowing the Governor to grant tax certainty to any company willing to make an investment in Oregon.

 

Reperesentaitve Huffman has co-sponsored both bills.

State Representative Jason Congers Wants to Expand Coordinated Care Organizations


Oregon is transforming its medicaid program for low income people by introducing coordinated care organiations that help oversee patient care.

 

State Representative Jason Conger is very supportive of these cco's that he hopes will ultimately make people healthier.

 

"It essentially is a patient engaged or responsiblity concept.  They try to provide a way for OHP to work with  cco's locally and help figure out ways to engage and hold patients responsible and in the medicaid population that is particularly challenging."

 

Many in the medicaid pouplation are poor or have addictions or mental health issues.

 

A bill sponsored by Conger, passed out of the House health care committee last week that would expand on these cco's and allow the Oregon Health Authority to fund more pilot projects to improve patient accountability.

Top Six Deschutes County Administrator Candidates Interview


The final six candidates for the post are in Bend for the next couple of days for interviews. 

 

The public will get a chance to meet and greet the candidates as well.

 

Commisioner Alan Unger is hopeful this time around.

 

"I'm feeling good. I wish some of these candidates applied last time.  Why didn't they?  That would have made things easier.  And of course Tom Anderson our interim administrator is there doing the job and doing a fine job.  So we're continuing to move forward."

 

The candidate "meet and greet" for the pblic will be Monday afternoon from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at the Deschutes Services Building on Wall Street.

 

Several panels will interview the candidates Tuesday.

 

The six candidates including interim adminsitrator Tom Anderson, two former administrators from Clackamas County, another city manager from Cannon Beach  and the final candidates are from Washington State and from South Carolina.

Keeping Kids Safe While on the Internet


Anyone with kids knows that the Internet plays a huge part in your child life these days, and some "bad guys" also know the kids are out there too.

 

Deschutes County Sheriff's Detective Zach Neemann says the best thing you can do is keep those lines of communication open with your child about Internet dangers and keep tabs on the websites they visit.

 

Neemann says "sexting" also is becoming a big problem. 

 

"It’s not like you're showing somebody face to face the intimate parts of your body. You’re just doing it over the phone or on a webcam, or things like that. Which doesn't feel necessarily as invading to these young kids. And trying to teach them that these have real world implications is a very difficult task."

 

Neeman says kids also learn to use an Internet "shorthand" when writing or messaging and there are websites where you can learn what they are talking about.

 

The IRS Can Be Your Friend


April 15th is right around the corner - and if you have not already filed your taxes - you may be dreading it.

 

But, the IRS can be your friend.  Stan Turel has been in the tax business for many years and says the i-r-s of the past - with their threat of gigantic penalties is now unfounded.  He says they really do want to work with you, but you need to take the first step and contact them with your situation.

 

“You know I hate to say this: people have this unfound fear of the IRS. In many cases, the fear alone is the biggest enemy, not the IRS. When you owe a ton of money on April 15th, if you just send your tax return in, the IRS will mail you back with ‘Hey you forgot to send your money in.” well, at least you’ll be eliminating the 5%per month penalty.  The IRS has reasonable forms and installment payment plans, I mean, they’re more ope than a car dealer. The installment payment plan a lot of times is very reasonable, depending on your budget and income. When you really want to fear, is when you totally ignore the IRS, ‘cuz then they can go after your bank accounts and things like that.”

 

Turel says many people are confused about earned income credit and deductions that you may not be aware of. There is plenty of help online or with a licensed tax preparer. 

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